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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

My advice to students when I taught negotiations was that if you think the other side has made an outrageous proposal, you should not come back with an equally outrageous counteroffer, creating a gap that will be difficult to bridge in further negotiations. Instead you should make a scene, storm out or threaten to do so, and make it clear–to yourself as well as to the other side–that you will not continue the negotiation with that number on the table.

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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

The principle of independent judgments (and decorrelated errors) has immediate applications for the conduct of meetings,… A simple rule can help: before an issue is discussed, all members of the committee should be asked to write a very brief summary of their position. This procedure makes good use of the value of the diversity of knowledge and opinion in the group. The standard practice of open discussion gives too much weight to the opinions of those who speak early and assertively, causing others to line up behind them.

(really, to line up, or to give up, or to be ignored entirely)

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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

In one condition of the experiment subjects were required to hold digits in memory during the task. The disruption of System 2 had a selective effect: it made it difficult for people to “unbelieve” false sentences. In a later test of memory, the depleted participants ended up thinking that many of the false sentences were true. The moral is significant: when System 2 is otherwise engaged, we will believe almost anything. System 1 is gullible and biased to believe, System 2 is in charge of doubting and unbelieving, but System 2 is sometimes busy, and often lazy.

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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

A happy mood loosens the control of System 2 over performance: when in a good mood, people become more intuitive and more creative but also less vigilant and more prone to logical errors. Here again, as in the mere exposure effect, the connection makes biological sense. A good mood is a signal that things are generally going well, the environment is safe, and it is all right to let one’s guard down. A bad mood indicates that things are not going very well, there may be a threat, and vigilance is required. Cognitive ease is both a cause and a consequence of a pleasant feeling.

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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

If you care about being thought credible and intelligent, do not use complex language where simpler language will do. … In an article titled “Consequences of Erudite Vernacular Utilized Irrespective of Necessity: Problems with Using Long Words Needlessly,” [Daniel Oppenheimer] showed that couching familiar ideas in pretentious language is taken as a sign of poor intelligence and low credibility.

(This admonition may sound familiar.)

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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

A reliable way to make people believe in falsehoods is frequent repetition, because familiarity is not easily distinguished from truth. Authoritarian institutions and marketers have always known this fact. But it was psychologists who discovered that you do not have to repeat the entire statement of a fact or idea to make it appear true. … The familiarity of one phrase in the statement sufficed to make the whole statement feel familiar, and therefore true.

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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

Words that you have seen before become easier to see again–you can identify them better than other words when they are shown very briefly or masked by noise, and you will be quicker (by a few hundredths of a second) to read them than to read other words. In short, you experience greater cognitive ease in perceiving a word you have seen earlier, and it is this sense of ease that gives you the impression of familiarity.

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Daniel Kahneman – Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)

…An odd feature of what happened is that your System 1 treated the mere conjunction of two words as representations of reality. Your body reacted in an attenuated replica of a reaction to the real thing, and the emotional response and physical recoil were part of the interpretation of the event. As cognitive scientists have emphasized in recent years, cognition is embodied; you think with your body, not only with your brain.