Fantasy, Fiction, Satire

Pratchett, Terry: Wyrd Sisters

1988

A Shakespeare-ish mashup wherein Granny learns that drama is all pretend; Nanny is not impressed; Magrat and a Fool flirt awkwardly; and though destiny must be fulfilled, it’s not so particular that it can’t be tricked a little.

(see @ wikipedia)
Fantasy, Fiction, Satire

Pratchett, Terry: Sourcery

1988

Fifth novel of Discworld, concerning wizards, would-be barbarians, Rincewind (Wizzard), and (of course) a multi-pedal piece of sapient luggage. Wouldn’t be a Rincewind storyline without the fearsome sound of lots of tiny feet.

(see @ wikipedia)
Fantasy, Fiction, Satire

Pratchett, Terry: Small Gods

1992

“The thirteenth of Terry Pratchett’s popular Discworld novels, published in 1992. It tells the origin of the god Om, and his relations with his prophet, the reformer Brutha. In the process, it satirises religious institutions, people, and practices, and the role of religion in political life.”

(see @ wikipedia)
Fantasy, Fiction, Satire

Pratchett, Terry: Reaper Man

1991

The Auditors don’t like personality (never say “I”); Death’s been acquiring one, so they fire him. He becomes a wicked good farmhand, while the new Death isn’t about yet so things aren’t dying like they should, which gets interesting.

(see @ wikipedia)
Fantasy, Fiction, Satire

Pratchett, Terry: Mort

1987

Fourth Discworld novel. Death gets an apprentice, who messes up the fabric of history because he likes a girl; meanwhile, Death tries out getting drunk and other “fun” human pasttimes. Turns out he’s a pretty good cook because he’s so quick with knives.

(see @ wikipedia)
Fantasy, Fiction, Satire

Pratchett, Terry: Men at Arms

1993

The Watch has new recruits representing minorities (dwarf, troll, werewolf), Vimes becomes Commander, Carrot (who seems a bit tall for a dwarf…) becomes Captain. There’s a gonne. And somebody is unsuspectingly the rightful king of Ankh-Morpork.

(see @ wikipedia)